If you replace the screen of your iPhone 11 with one of a third party, Apple will nag you about it

If you ever want to replace the screen of your iPhone 11, 11 Pro, or 11 Pro Max, Apple won’t stop nagging you about it.

For the first four days, a notification asking you to verify that you have a genuine Apple display will show. After those days have passed, the message will be moved to the Settings app for fifteen days. After that, the warning will become less intrusive, only appearing in the About section in Settings.

Don’t think that you can buy a parts only iPhone 11 which still has a genuine Apple screen and swap the screen from that either. Apple has special tools which pair the new display to the iPhone to verify it was repaired by them or an authorised repair service so you’ll still get that same message even if you or an unauthorised repair service use an Apple screen.

A similar thing happened last year with the iPhone XS, XS Max, and XR which made third party battery replacements a lot harder than before. Even if the battery you or an unauthorised repair service installed was a genuine Apple one, it all came down to whether or not Apple or an authorised repair service installed the battery. Otherwise, you’d still be locked out of accessing battery health features. I’m not sure whether this is present on the 11 series phones as well.

An iPhone 11 screen replacement from Apple without an AppleCare+ plan costs £196, whilst screen replacements for the iPhone 11 Pro is £282, and an official Pro Max screen replacement costs £326. If you have an AppleCare+ plan, you get a replacement for £25, although it does add a significant amount of money onto the price tag for your iPhone to buy AppleCare+ along with it.

However, if you’re lucky enough to still be on iOS 13.0 and not 13.1 or newer on your iPhone 11, you’re unaffected by the genuine screen issue since this feature appears to only be present on 13.1 and newer. So, if you want to futureproof your iPhone 11 or have dropped pevious phone and cracked their screens before and are worried about doing the same with your 11, install the tvOS beta profile to block updates from reaching your iPhone. That way if you want to replace your screen or have an unauthorised repair service to do it, you can and you won’t get nagged about it and you also won’t get nagged to update iOS. But avoiding iOS updates does come with its disadvantages: no more security or bug fixes, app support to get worse over time, and also missing out on all the features newer iOS versions include.

What do you think about Apple’s attitude towards third-party repairs? Leave your opinion in the comments.

-Chas 😎

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How to block iOS upgrades

When I first bought my 4S, it was running the laggy, slow iOS 9.3.5. After getting the charging port fixed under warranty, I downloaded the iOS 6 IPSW, and restored it. iOS 6.1.3 downgrades are still ‘authorized’ by Apple for the 4S. I then updated to 8.4.1 through the Settings and then reset my device for the best experience.

Whilst I was installing some apps, I suddenly got a pop-up notification. It read “iOS 9.3.6 is now available for your iPhone”

I realised not only had iOS 9.3.6’s update package taken up a large portion of my storage, but there was also an annoying badge next to the Settings icon on the home screen that wouldn’t go away. Also the fear of the update automatically installing overnight and slowing down the iPhone to a crawl (and forcing me to repeat the downgrade process again) scared me. I knew I had to take action to prevent iOS 9 from being installed on my iPhone 4S.

That was when I found out about the tvOS beta profile OTA blocking method. It’s simple: install a beta profile, reboot, and poof! Settings will now think there is indeed no update and act as though iOS 8.4.1 (in my case) is the latest.

To disable OTA updates on your Apple device, follow these steps:

  1. Head over to betaprofiles.com, scroll down to find the profile labelled ‘Block update for iOS’
  2. Download it and then Settings will open, prompting you to install it. Once installed, reboot your device.
  3. Once rebooted, try running software update again. If it says that your software is now up to date, then it’s worked. If it still offers the dowloaded update, go to Usage in General and delete the OTA. Then reboot and try checking again.
  4. If there is an annoying red ‘1’ badge by the top right corner of the Settings app on the home screen, then factory resetting your device’s settings (General –> Reset –> Reset all settings) appears to be the only option without jailbreaking that you can do to get rid of the badge. Once done, you may have to install the tvOS beta profile again if it gets deleted during the reset to continue blocking updates.

Now, the software update section in Settings will act as though your current iOS version is the latest version of iOS available, in my case iOS 8.4.1. You will not need to worry about automatic updates since there won’t be any to install.

Enjoy!

-Chas 😎