If you don’t update your iPhone 5 by the 3rd of November major functionality will break

If you do not update your iPhone 5 or iPad 4 (cellular variant) to iOS 10.3.4 by 3rd November, major functionality will stop working.

Functionality that require the correct date and time such as web browsing and app store will allegedly break should users not update to iOS 10.3.4 by 3rd November. GPS functionality such as the weather and maps apps will also require an update. After 3rd November, it will also be impossible to update the software directly on the device, requiring the use of a PC or Mac to install the update instead.

If you’re holding out on an iOS version like iOS 9 or even the nostalgic iOS 6 and are unwilling to update, you could try saving your onboard SHSH blobs and restoring from 10.3.4 to your desired iOS version through futurerestore or 3utools, enabling the option to preserve the baseband when doing so. However, this hasn’t been tested and there is no guarantee that it works.

iPhone 4S and cellular iPad 2, 3, and Mini 1st generation devices will also have similar issues, although they won’t be as severe, as there has been no information published on what will happen if users of devices with the A5 chip do not update to iOS 9.3.6, but considering iOS 9.3.6 is so slow on these devices, if the effects of holding out on an older iOS version on these devices are the same as for the iPhone 5, this will be received poorly by iPhone 4S users (like me) running on older iOS versions such as iOS 8.4.1 and 6.1.3.

If you’re using an iPhone 5 or iPad 4, the best thing you can do right now is update to iOS 10.3.4 and wait until a workaround is found.

What iOS version are you using on your older iPhone, how well does it run, and how will this news affect you? Tell me down in the comments below!

-Chas ๐Ÿ˜Ž

iOS 13.1.3 released to fix several bugs in iOS 13.1.2

iOS 13.1.3 has been released for all iOS 13-compatible iPhones to fix issues from iOS 13.1.2. If you’re on any version of iOS 13, you need this update. If you’re on iOS 12 then stay away until Apple can release an update to iOS 13 which makes it a lot more stable.

Apple states that iOS 13.1.3 fixes the following problems:

  • A problem where the phone would not ring or vibrate if called.
  • An issue that may prevent opening a meeting invite in Mail.
  • A problem with the Health app where data may not display correctly after daylight saving time adjusts.
  • An issue in Voice Memos where recordings may not download when restoring from an iCloud backup.
  • A bug with Apple Watch which may prevent it from pairing successfully.
  • An issue with the Apple Watch where notifications may not be received.
  • A problem of bluetooth disconnecting on certain vehicles.

It also improves launch performance for apps that use Game Centre and improves connection reliability for Bluetooth hearing aids and headsets.

iPadOS 13.1.3 has also been released for iPadOS 13-compatible iPads which should include these changes as well.

Have you noticed a stability increase since updating to iOS 13.1.3 or has it gotten worse? Tell me down in the comments below!

-Chas ๐Ÿ˜Ž

iOS 13.1.2 being plagued by signal dropping issues

Several users have complained that after installing Apple’s iOS 13.1.2 update calls have been randomly dropping out or the phone loses its signal completely.

Apple have now closed the signing window for all iOS versions older than 13.1.2, meaning that a downgrade to fix the issue is impossible unless you have saved SHSH blogs before an older version went unsigned.

If you’re on iOS 13.1.2 and experiencing this issue, the best you can do is hope for an update to come out soon fixing it. You could also try installing the iOS 13.2 beta and see if this helps.

iOS 13 has already experienced several issues which has caused Apple to release three updates in the first few weeks to fix it.

What do you think of iOS 13?๏ฟผ What issues are you having? Tell me down in the comments below!

-Chas ๐Ÿ˜Ž

Do Apple really slow down older iPhones with software updates?

If you have an older iPhone that you bought 2+ years ago you might suddenly start to notice a slowdown.

You may start to think Apple are pushing software updates made to deliberately slow down your iPhone to encourage you to upgrade to a new one. But this is false.

Battery degradation

Over time, just like laptop batteries, iPhone batteries degrade, giving less and less battery life and making the phone less reliable. Some power for the CPU comes from the battery, but if the CPU requests for more power than the battery’s got, it can trigger a sudden shutdown.

Just imagine if these kept happening. How unbearable it would be. You may even start carrying around a non-iPhone as well to use in the case your iPhone unexpectedly shuts down.

If your capacity is above 80%, there isn’t really much to worry about, but if it’s under 75%, you might want to start looking at a battery or phone replacement.

Performance Management

Apple’s answer to this comes in the form of performance management. Simply, when your iPhone detects that it is booting back up from an unexpected shutdown, it starts to limit the CPU’s performance to prevent the shutdown happening again. This is why your iPhone will become slower after an unexpected shutdown.

You can turn off performance management either by replacing the battery of your iPhone, or heading to Settings –> Battery –> Battery Health, where an option to disable it should be present provided your iPhone is running iOS 11.3 or later. You can also see your battery health percentage here. Please be aware that if an unexpected shutdown occurs again it will be enabled again.

iPhone 3G, 4, and 4S slowdowns

Despite what me saying above was true for most iPhones, it appears that the last major OS upgrades for these devices slowed them down and made them unusable in some cases.

The iPhone 3G received iOS 4 but did not receive many of the iOS 4 features such as wallpapers and multitasking and iOS 4 made existing functionality a lot slower on the iPhone 3G. This was not due to battery degradation but rather due to planned obsolesence. Apparently, some of the issues were fixed on iOS 4.x updates, however.

The iPhone 4 received iOS 7 and missed out on a few features but still had a lot of the functionality. However, in some cases iOS 7 would lag on this device especially when browsing the internet and switching between apps.

The iPhone 4S received iOS 9 and missed out on a few features but still had a lot of the functionality. However, it was unusable. It would lag everywhere. This led to me downgrading my 4S to iOS 8.4.1 by downgrading to 6.1.3 through the signed IPSW and then installing the 8.4.1 OTA.

These are only three cases however and I doubt Apple are planning on deliberately slowing down any more iPhones now that word is out about those three.

Conclusion

So if your iPhone has become slower, unless you’re on a 3G, 4, or 4S, blame your battery, not Apple. They only want to ensure that your phone is reliable and doesn’t unexpectedly shut down.

What’s your experience with the performance management feature? Tell me below in the comments!

-Chas ๐Ÿ˜Ž

Apple no longer signing iOS versions other than 13.1.2 and 13.1, preventing downgrades

If you’ve heard of how much of a buggy mess iOS 13 is at the moment to the point where Apple have already released 3 minor updates for it after its release, you may have been planning to downgrade to iOS 12.4.1. But now you can’t.

Apple have stopped signing all iOS versions for iOS 13 capable iPhones except iOS 13.1 and 13.1.2. Why they stopped signing iOS 13.1.1 and kept signing 13.1 is unknown.

Also, for the devices that are now stuck on iOS 12.x versions of iOS because Apple deemed that they are incapable of running iOS 13, iOS 12.4.1 has gone unsigned for them too meaning that only the exclusive iOS 12.4.2 remains signed for those devices.

This means that no signed iOS versions that are publicly jailbreakable can be downgraded to anymore. However, with the checkm8 BootROM exploit compatible with all iPhones from the 4S to the X, that shouldn’t last long.

What iOS version are you currently using on your iPhone and how are you getting on with it? Tell me in the comments section!

-Chas ๐Ÿ˜Ž

How to block iOS upgrades

When I first bought my 4S, it was running the laggy, slow iOS 9.3.5. After getting the charging port fixed under warranty, I downloaded the iOS 6 IPSW, and restored it. iOS 6.1.3 downgrades are still ‘authorized’ by Apple for the 4S. I then updated to 8.4.1 through the Settings and then reset my device for the best experience.

Whilst I was installing some apps, I suddenly got a pop-up notification. It read “iOS 9.3.6 is now available for your iPhone”

I realised not only had iOS 9.3.6’s update package taken up a large portion of my storage, but there was also an annoying badge next to the Settings icon on the home screen that wouldn’t go away. Also the fear of the update automatically installing overnight and slowing down the iPhone to a crawl (and forcing me to repeat the downgrade process again) scared me. I knew I had to take action to prevent iOS 9 from being installed on my iPhone 4S.

That was when I found out about the tvOS beta profile OTA blocking method. It’s simple: install a beta profile, reboot, and poof! Settings will now think there is indeed no update and act as though iOS 8.4.1 (in my case) is the latest.

To disable OTA updates on your Apple device, follow these steps:

  1. Head over to betaprofiles.com, scroll down to find the profile labelled ‘Block update for iOS’
  2. Download it and then Settings will open, prompting you to install it. Once installed, reboot your device.
  3. Once rebooted, try running software update again. If it says that your software is now up to date, then it’s worked. If it still offers the dowloaded update, go to Usage in General and delete the OTA. Then reboot and try checking again.
  4. If there is an annoying red ‘1’ badge by the top right corner of the Settings app on the home screen, then factory resetting your device’s settings (General –> Reset –> Reset all settings) appears to be the only option without jailbreaking that you can do to get rid of the badge. Once done, you may have to install the tvOS beta profile again if it gets deleted during the reset to continue blocking updates.

Now, the software update section in Settings will act as though your current iOS version is the latest version of iOS available, in my case iOS 8.4.1. You will not need to worry about automatic updates since there won’t be any to install.

Enjoy!

-Chas ๐Ÿ˜Ž

iOS 13 – last major iOS update for the 6S/SE, or not?

Not too long ago, iOS 13 was announced. It dropped support for the iPhone 6/6+ at the same time as the 5S, despite it being a year older. This came as a surprise although many people had been speculating it for months. This now leaves the 6S, 6S+, and SE as the oldest iPhones to run iOS 13.

Although iOS 13 wasnโ€™t released to the public very long ago, only about two weeks, people are wondering: will the 6S support iOS 14?

The iPhone 6S consists of an Apple A9 processor and 2GB RAM. However, it, along with the SE, are the last two iPhones to feature 16GB storage options, which is tight for any iPhone on iOS 10 or later. The iPhone 7 moved onto 32GB as its lowest option.

iOS updates, along with apps, take up a lot of storage nowadays. This means that 16GB iPhones could potentially become slower after updating to the point where they become like the iPhone 4S on iOS 9, and I know what thatโ€™s like, hence why I downgraded it to iOS 8.4.1.

The 6S and SE are still very capable phones and run brilliantly on iOS 13. However, if Apple do want to release iOS 14 for it, they should definitely restrict some features to 32GB variants and larger, as 16GB just isnโ€™t enough anymore and Apple should end the life of 16GB iPhones carefully without slowing them down a lot first.

So, to conclude, I think that Apple should ensure that if the 6S and SE get iOS 14 (which they should), they should keep it fast performance-wise and go easy on 16GB variants.

Do you think the 6S and SE should get iOS 13 or not? Why? Leave your opinion down below in the comments.

-Chas ๐Ÿ˜Ž

iOS 13.1 has been released by Apple

As of yesterday iOS 13.1 alongside iPadOS 13 has been released to the public for all iOS devices compatible with iOS 13, which are:

iPhone

  • iPhone 6S
  • iPhone 6S+
  • iPhone SE
  • iPhone 7
  • iPhone 7+
  • iPhone 8
  • iPhone 8+
  • iPhone X
  • iPhone XS
  • iPhone XS Max
  • iPhone XR
  • iPhone 11
  • iPhone 11 Pro
  • iPhone 11 Pro Max

iPad

  • iPad Mini 4
  • iPad Mini 5
  • iPad 9.7 (2017)
  • iPad 9.7 (2018)
  • iPad 10.2 (2019)
  • iPad Air (2nd generation)
  • iPad Air (2019)
  • All iPad Pro models

iPod Touch

  • iPod Touch 7th generation

If you are on the iOS 13/13.1 beta you will have to delete the beta profile before attemping to update, otherwise you will either be offered the latest beta (if on an older beta) or told that you are up to date (if you are on the latest beta).

The following devices remain on iOS 12 and will not receive any future updates, except in very exceptional circumstances (refer to iOS 6.1.6 and iOS 9.3.6).

iPhone

  • iPhone 5S
  • iPhone 6
  • iPhone 6+

iPad

  • iPad Mini 2
  • iPad Mini 3
  • iPad Air (1st generation)

iPod

  • iPod Touch 6th generation

If you want to update your device, then the update is available to download and install right now. You also still currently have the opportunity to downgrade to 12.4.1 right now, so if you want to go back, now’s that time. Chances are Apple will stop signing iOS 12.4.1 soon, preventing downgrades without the use of device specific SHSH blobs.

If you’re on a device that doesn’t support iOS 13, don’t worry! Your device will remain operational on iOS 12 not to mention most apps will still support it until iOS 14/15 is released so you still have plenty of time to plan an upgrade whilst still having access to a great majority of apps.

What iOS device are you using and what iOS version does it run? Leave a comment down below.

Enjoy your update!

-Chas

Most used phones in my collection

I have many phones in my collection, as well as iPods and tablets, although I am still looking to expand my tablet collection (Nexus 7 and iPad 1st gen are tablets of which I am planning to buy at some point). This blog post, however, is about the phones (and one iPod) of which I use the most often. Please note that my Galaxy S9 does not count since it is not a backup/collection phone at the moment and is currently still my daily driver, not to mention that I am writing this blog post using DeX on it so I’d say it’d be quite hard to get pictures of anyway.

iPhone 4S

This iPhone 4S has since been downgraded to iOS 8.4.1 using the iOS 6 OTA method since I purchased it on iOS 9.3.5. Most of the time I have to resort to downloading old, previously compatible versions of apps such as Pages, WordPress, and Opera Mini, but some apps still support iOS 8 even on their current version. iOS 8 runs fairly well on the 4S, but not as good as iOS 6 did. I managed to buy this iPhone for ยฃ25 although it did originally have charging issues which were fixed by the shop for free when I brought it back in.

iPhone 6S

I was given this iPhone 6S for free and it had a shattered screen and at the time it ran iOS 11.0.1, but Touch ID did not work and even if it did, considering how unstable iOS 11.x was, I would probably have upgraded anyway.  Upgrading to iOS 12.2 (latest iOS at the time, I think) fixed Touch ID. I tried replacing the screen myself but a cable connecting the screen to the board snapped and in the end I got it professionally repaired and decided that if I wanted to start repairing phones, I should start out on less complicated ones, such as the iPhone 4 and old Samsung phones. I have not attempted repairing another phone yet but at some point I will but it definitely won’t be anything post-4S or post-S4. When iOS 13 was released as a public beta, I downloaded it but later switched to the developer beta instead and am currently on 13.1, dev beta 4.

iPod Nano 7th generation

I bought this iPod Nano 7th generation for ยฃ75 from a local second hand gaming shop.  I use it mainly for listening to FM radio, as well as listening to music and downloaded videos on the go.

Galaxy J3 (2016)

I was given this phone for free and the first thing I did was install LineageOS 14.1 (Android 7.1.2 Nougat) on it. It now runs fast but it does have a couple of scratches on the screen and doesn’t vibrate when someone calls or I get a notification. Whether this is a universal J3 (2016) issue, an individual hardware issue, or an issue with the ROM I’m using I don’t know. But this made me realise that this is an unreliable backup phone and my backup SIM card goes to… my 6S.

Upcoming devices for my collection

I do plan on expanding my collection in the future. Who knows what good offers on phones I will find. My tablet collection is also lacking with only one tablet in it at the moment, two if you count my daily tablet driver.

  • ASUS Nexus 7
  • iPad 1st generation
  • Galaxy S II
  • Galaxy A3 (2015)
  • iPhone 3G
  • iPhone 3GS

My plans for the Nexus 7 is to test it on all of its available Android versions to see how slower/faster it gets as it is updated. For the iPad 1st generation, I plan on installing an old version of OneNote on it as well as Apple productivity apps and using it as a notepad and portable but fairly large productivity device. For the Galaxy S II, I plan on debloating it to make it look like stock Android 4.0 rather than TouchWiz. For the A3, I honestly don’t know what my plans are for that yet but I have heard of some good custom ROMs for it. For the iPhone 3G, I plan on downgrading it to iOS 2.x, getting a box for it, and putting it on display as a collector’s item. As for the 3GS, a downgrade to iOS 4.1 seems likely and then I’ll test out some old apps and games.

What devices do YOU own and what do you use them for? What phones, tablets, and iPods do you plan on adding to your collection in the future and why? Leave your answers down below in the comments.

Hope you enjoyed this post!

-Chas

 

Living with the iPhone 4S as a main phone in 2019 (iOS 6)

My current main phone is a Samsung Galaxy S9. However, another phone I own is an iPhone 4S which I have downgraded to iOS 6.1.3. iOS 6 is the last iOS generation that has the classic user interface which iOS 7 abandoned for a more modern UI.

The current stable version of iOS (at the time of writing) is 12.4.1, and the latest available version of iOS is iOS 13.1 beta 1. iOS 6 is several major versions of iOS out of date. As you can guess, not many current versions of apps work on it. Any app that requires iOS 11 or later or does not support the iPhone 4S on its current version will refuse to offer an older version either for some reason, probably something to do with iOS 11 being 64-bit only and iOS 6 never having run on any 64-bit device.

First selection of apps I downloaded were games from developers such as Ketchapp, such as Twist and Stick Hero. Games like PAC-MAN and Stack did not support iOS 6 with their current version of apps but did have an older version which did. Apps like WordPress and Google, which demanded at least iOS 11 on their current versions, refused to even offer an old version and had to have an older version downloaded using a trick in iTunes and then sideloaded.

I’m actually typing this from my 4S now on iOS 6 using the WordPress app and so far it’s working fine. Viewing Notifications in the WordPress app, however, causes the app to break completely and the only way to get it working again is to reinstall it.

Siri works fine; of course, features like ‘Hey Siri’ are missing and some languages only support one gender’s voice. However, testing out Siri, she appears to be capable of opening apps; stating her loyalty to Apple when I asked her about her preference between iOS and Android; sending text messages, and searching the Internet for definitions.

I chose Opera Mini as my preferred web browser. From my experiences with old iOS devices, Safari always lags and crashes on older iOS devices but Opera runs smoothly and rarely crashes. Some pages don’t display properly but quite a lot do as well. Opera Mini is amazing on old devices; it even runs well on my ZTE Racer, an Android phone from 2010 which wasn’t even a flagship at the time!

How well does it run? The iPhone 4S started off on iOS 5 and iOS 6 is its first major OS upgrade. It’s actually very snappy and opens some apps almost instantly but others like games take a little longer to load. Most apps run well and I can hold several apps in the background without lagging, unlike the exact same phone running iOS 9, which stutters when switching between apps and multitasking while keeping a smooth experience is almost impossible!

If you want the better app support, there’s always iOS 8.4.1, of which can be updated to from the Settings menu of iOS 6. I decided to stay on iOS 6 for the nostalgic user interface and snappy performance, but for some people, iOS 8 may be more suited to their needs. iOS 9, however, is near unusable on the iPhone 4S and that suits nobody unless you love waiting for ages for an app or webpage to load and you love that feeling you get when an app crashes, which you probably don’t.

Anyways, what iOS version does your older iDevice run and how well does it do so? Make sure to comment on this post. I did hope you enjoyed!

-Chas